Henry Ledford Obituary, Henry Ledford World War II veteran has died

Henry Ledford Obituary, Death – Henry C. Ledford has sadly died unexpectedly, leaving loved ones and family and entire community in grief and agony according to an online share. ” The news of the passing of Henry C. Ledford, a veteran of World War II, left us in a state of profound sadness, and it was with a heavy heart that we were informed of his passing. Henry C. Ledford had been a loyal soldier for his country throughout the duration of the fight.

He was 103 years old when he passed away; he had reached his full life expectancy at that point. Henry C. Ledford, whose parents David and Ollie Napier Ledford having passed away before to the time of his birth on September 22nd, 1919 in Marcum, Kentucky, was born there. Henry C. Ledford was the son of David and Ollie Napier Ledford. When he was born, both of his parents were already gone to a better place.

When he was still a young lad, both of his parents had already passed away from various illnesses. He was a war hero who had served his country in the Army of the United States of America during the Second World War. His military obligations had been fulfilled in Europe. During World War II, he served in the United States Army with the 103rd Infantry Division as a member of that division.

This division was also referred to as the “Cactus Division” at one point in time. During the course of the war, this division served under the command of the Seventh Army of the United States and the 6th Army Group. Throughout the duration of the conflict, it was deployed inside the service of each of those armies in some capacity. It was a responsibility that was given to the VI Corps, the XV Corps, and the XXI Corps in the order that they were listed above.

After the war was over, it was a part of the VI Corps’ dash across Bavaria and into the Alps, reaching Innsbruck, Austria, taking the Brenner Pass, and earning the honor of linking up with the United States Fifth Army coming north from Vipiteno, Italy, joining the Italian and Western European fronts on May 4, 1945. After the war was over, it was a part of the VI Corps’ dash across Bavaria and into the Alps.

On that day, Following the conclusion of the war, it became a part of the VI Corps’ hasty retreat across Bavaria and into the Alps. To put it another way, on that day, this maneuver was the contribution that the VI Corps provided to the “dash” that they made over Bavaria and into the Alps. During the time that this event took place, the VI Corps was in the midst of a high-speed pursuit across the entirety of Bavaria and farther into the Alps.

In April of 1945, it was given occupational duties to do until the 20th of that month, at which point it began the offensive, pursuing an enemy who was escaping through Stuttgart and capturing M√ľnsingen on the 24th of that month. Prior to that, in April, it had been given occupational duties to do until the 20th of that month. Prior to then, in the month of April, it had been delegated certain tasks to perform in the workplace until the twentieth of that month.

After that, it continued to carry out the occupational obligations that were assigned to it right up until the end of the year. The Dachau subcamp that was also known as the Kaufering concentration camp was liberated on April 27 by the men who were a part of the division that invaded Landsberg on that same day. Another name for this camp was the Kaufering concentration camp. This camp was also known as the Kaufering concentration camp at one point in time.”